Available courses

Product Development

Product Development

Product development covers all aspects of production innovation, from conceptual thinking to delivering products to customers. When an existing product is modified to generate new interest, these phases validate the potential success of the modification in generating business. Having a strong product development strategy can support your business in turning ideas into profitable products and then modifying them to stay competitive in the marketplace. Your product development strategy can reveal areas for improvement and which approaches are most successful. To get the most out of your product development strategy, consider how you can apply various techniques to each step and adapt them to your past experience.


Principles of Marketing

Principles of Marketing

In this course, you will learn about the marketing process and examine the scope of marketing decisions that an organization must make in order to sell its products and services. You'll also learn how marketers think this way—the best marketers know that the focus of marketing is always on the consumer. You will begin to think about who the consumers of goods and services are, what consumers need, and what consumers want. Marketing is about understanding how to communicate with consumers. The four activities of marketing: creating products and services that serve consumers, communicating a clear value proposition, providing products and services in a way that optimizes value, and exchanging (or trading) the value of those products.


Production And Operation Management

Production And Operation Management

Production and operations management involves the design, planning, and control of operating systems designed to provide goods and services. This course provides students with knowledge and understanding of the nature and characteristics of operating systems in the manufacturing and service sectors.

Understand the development topics of manufacturing and service operations management and be able to outline the strategic issues involved in operational decision-making;

Ability to demonstrate the link between operational strategy, company strategy and organizational performance;

Familiarity with inventory management techniques, the principles and concepts behind instant and MRP systems, and be able to identify the limitations and problems of implementing these technologies in practice;

Understand the evolution of quality management and practice; Assess the relationship between quality and competence, quality and competitiveness;

Ability to consider the concept of process management and its impact on practice;

Ability to identify links between organizational structure, technology, operational activities and competitiveness.

 


Principles of Management

Principles of Management

This Principles of Management course is designed to help students understand the main functions of management (planning, organization, leadership, and control) and the importance of each function's relationship to the company's existence. This course describes how companies can use management to set and achieve goals through individuals, groups, and other types of resources. It also analyzes communication and ethics in an organization. Other topics include decision-making, change, employee development, organizational structure, management control, leadership, conflict resolution, information security, and globalization.

 

 

 


Marketing And Sales Management

Marketing And Sales Management

Marketing is often seen as the most important function of any organization; Without an effective marketing campaign, the organization will be disconnected from customer needs, market conditions and development; Customers will not know or have access to the business's products and services.  In addition to the best-selling capabilities required for success, it is also necessary to understand the market, market research, distribution channels, marketing strategies, advertising, public relations, pricing strategies, etc. Sales/marketing managers must also manage employees: recruit, motivate, mentor, train and control them, and plan and organize their activities.  This program provides training on the broad responsibilities of sales and marketing managers in a competitive business world.

When people and resources are scarce and expensive, you need to make every investment in your salespeople. Your sales force is a major growth engine and a great source of market feedback. At the same time, it can quickly become expensive and difficult to manage. Lead an effective sales force and help you optimize salesperson performance by learning to reduce costs while increasing sales.

Learn how strategies such as analyzing sales calls, adjusting territories, shifting product or market focus, reallocating salesperson time, or resizing salespeople transform performance to maximize salesperson performance. Learn to use compensation systems and organizational structures to motivate salespeople and third-party distribution channels to achieve fruitful results. Leading an effective sales force is an intensive experience that will change the way you approach sales and inspire results.


International Marketing

International Marketing

This course brings together two key subjects, international marketing and cross-industry innovation. It will provide the basis for international marketing and then explain how the company can grow by going abroad or looking for ideas/expanding into other countries or industries. Transnational and cross-industry innovation, terminology and analysis platforms run not only through this course, but also applicable to other specialized courses.

As an introductory course, we keep the concepts short so that learners can easily enter the wonderful world of international marketing. In the second specialization process, more specific aspects of the business will be provided, such as managing products, prices, locations and promotions, as well as positioning and positioning.

Upon successful completion of this course, learners will receive the following results:

(1) Understand the core meaning of marketing and international marketing.

(2) Understanding international marketing is about striking the right balance between maximizing cross-cultural similarity (the Etic approach) and custom marketing (the Emic approach) to make important local differences.

(3) Learn how to buy through cross-industry innovation or expand to other industries at home and abroad.

(4) Lay a solid foundation for subsequent courses (introduction and execution of international marketing) and professional industry specialties.

 


Principles of Accounting

Principles of Accounting

Introduction

Accounting is a very important topic that translates all financial events of a business into numbers, enabling managers and other users to report, analyze, and make decisions that help read about the financial health of the business and predict future outcomes.

I built a course using a variety of reliable accounting resources. The content is based on U.S. GAAP, and I've also leveraged the knowledge and experience I've gained in my own career spanning more than 15 years. Currently, I work as a finance manager in a contracting company. At the same time, I love teaching and sharing my knowledge with everyone who is interested in accounting. It took me two years to provide you with this content, and I made sure that every piece of information was valid and trustworthy.

This course will guide you through all the basics of accounting for a sole proprietorship owned by an individual or entity. We will start with the basics of service companies and then work on the business of selling goods, including major topics such as inventory costing, cash and cash equivalents, trade receivables, plant assets, natural resources, intangible assets, and fundamental financial analysis. After each section, I will practice the complete exercises with you. Together we will gradually learn and practice the details.

This course is geared toward:

ü  Students of any educational institution

ü  Professionals interested in accounting

ü  Accountants who want to expand their skills

ü  Business owners

ü  Everyone is looking to learn about accounting and how it works



Entrepreneurship

Entrepreneurship

Introduction

This course enables students to understand the definition and scope of entrepreneurship, the drivers and barriers to entrepreneurship.

Students will understand the impact of national culture and economy on entrepreneurship and will explore the impact of entrepreneurs' personal characteristics and personal situational factors, including education and background.

Students will also learn about the role and importance of small companies to the economy, as well as social enterprise and socio-economic development. Students will also be expected to understand the balance of risks and rewards of entrepreneurship, and they will investigate and reflect on their entrepreneurial and enterprising characteristics.

This article will discuss examples of entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial organizations, with the hope that students will be able to draw on local, personal, and general knowledge as well as their learning in order to be able to identify the characteristics of startups.

Learning outcomes

By the end of this course, students will be able to:

1 Explore and illustrate the range of venture capital types that may be considered entrepreneurial.

2 Assess the impact of small businesses on the economy.

3 Identify and evaluate key aspects of the entrepreneurial mindset.

4 Research on different environments that foster or hinder entrepreneurship.

 


Computer Application

Computer Application

introduction

Most people in this world don't have basic computer literacy. This course will help you understand the basics of computers and some basic operations of application software. After completing this course, you will be able to analyze different objects of computer and software applications very easily.

As we move towards a world where learning technology is essential to improving your skill set. A complete shift to technology with basic knowledge of machines/computers is detrimental to everyone, which is why the industry/organizations focus on those who understand basic computers. Or we can say the core knowledge of computers.

In this lesson, you will learn some of the basic elements of a computer through a hands-on application. It will be fun and challenging tasks, but we make the course easier and more interactive.

Creating Amazing Wordpress Websites

Creating Amazing Wordpress Websites


Business English

Business English

Business English is part of English for a specific purpose and can be either a specialization in English language learning and teaching, or a variation of international English. Many non-native English speakers study this subject by doing business with companies in English-speaking countries or located outside the English-speaking world, but these companies still use English as a shared language or lingua franca. A lot of English communication takes place in business circles around the world between non-native speakers.

Business English means different wives for different people. For some, it focuses on vocabulary and topics used in the fields of business, trade, finance, and international relations. For others, it refers to the communication skills used in the workplace and focuses on the language and skills required for typical business communication, such as presentation, negotiation, meeting, small talk, socializing, communication, report writing, and a unified approach. In both cases, it can also be taught to native English speakers, for example, high school students who are ready to enter the job market. One can also wander through the academy or the crowd about it


Sustainable Operations Management

Sustainable Operations Management

Unit Aims

The purpose of this unit is to develop learners' understanding, knowledge and skills in sustainable operations management, including the key elements of sustainability and their importance to businesses, the business drivers and barriers that affect sustainable development, the different practices that can be used to improve sustainability throughout the supply chain, as well as performance indicators and the business impact of sustainability. Explore a variety of different departments.


 Strategic Financial Management

Strategic Financial Management

Unit Aims

The aim of this unit is to enable learners to apply financial principles relevant to management in an organisational context, including analytical techniques and theories/models of management accounting, evaluation of budgetary processes, recommending funding sources and appraising investment options.

Business Maths

Business Maths

Mathematics is considered the study of numbers, shapes, and patterns, and when this discipline is applied to business, it becomes business mathematics. For businesses, this is an important topic that students must deal with. It acts as a tool to help solve and control various business problems. The fundamental goal of studying this discipline is to adapt knowledge of various mathematical tools, techniques, and models to help deal with real-life business situations. It is also known as "business mathematics". In this article, we will discuss this particular topic, namely. Business Mathematics. What does this mean, and what topics are included, the importance of learning mathematics to business and its scope?


It is a discipline consisting of mathematical concepts related to business, and it is not limited to costs, profits/losses, and interest. It goes beyond these basic concepts and includes other mathematical concepts. Operational or financial activities are mathematically controlled by the business, such as control over cash flow, payroll, revenue, financial analysis, risk analysis, etc. Mathematical formulas help in almost every area of business, such as payroll or payroll calculations, employee performance management, profit and loss analysis, etc. Mathematical models help analyze business problems and find appropriate solutions so that they don't happen in the future. It also helps to assess problems and make appropriate decisions in this regard to streamline business processes.


Modern Presentation Skill

Modern Presentation Skill

Presentation skills and public speaking skills are the most important personal skills you can develop to succeed in life. Life is a series of presentations. Those who developed strong speaking skills and public speaking skills performed well in school, earned jobs and promotions, and often rose to the highest levels of leadership in corporate, government, and civic life. People who fail to develop their presentation skills tend to stagnate or stagnate in the mid-range. Sadly, presentation skills are either not taught in primary or secondary education or are poorly taught.  

A complete presentation skills masterclass for every occasion is your way to get a Master's education on how to demonstrate effectively. You will receive in-depth training on all aspects of presentation skills - public speaking - communication skills - storytelling skills - PowerPoint - Camera Confidence 

This course is designed to be a one-stop shop for all your presentation skills and public speaking skills training needs.

This course covers the following:

1. So far, there have been more lectures on presentation skills than any other course on Udemy.

2. The training lasts longer than any other course (29 hours. Sometimes the more the merrier!

3. More in-depth training skills than any other course.


Supply Chain Planning, Modelling

Supply Chain Planning, Modelling

introduction

The unit aims to provide learners with in-depth knowledge about planning processes across all key aspects of supply chain management.

The relevance of each of the planning processes, the associated information requirements and modelling and analytic techniques are covered.

Master in Business Management (Level 7)

Master in Business Management (Level 7)

Overview

Do you want to boost your career prospects by studying for a busines management Master's degree alongside your current job?

On this MA Business Management Learning at Work Master's course, you can specialise and enhance your current management or leadership capabilities and develop a more strategic view of organisational management and behaviour.

Because the course is work-based, you need to already be in a full-time, part-time or voluntary role. If you don't have an undergraduate degree, you could still do this postgraduate course if you have several years experience in a responsible position (such as a military role) or you have high-level skills through experience that isn't reflected in your qualifications.

You can tailor the course to match your professional and personal aspirations and your employer's objectives. The way you learn is flexible, so you can study wherever is most convenient for you and schedule your studies around your existing commitments.

You'll get to put the skills you learn to work instantly in your job, contributing to the success of your company. When you complete the course, you'll improve your career prospects and have the skills and knowledge to perform more effectively in your job.


Supply Chain and Operations Strategy

Supply Chain and Operations Strategy

Introduction

The aim of this unit is to develop learners’ understanding of supply chain and operations management, including its scope, impact and importance as well as the strategic decisions that need to be made in today’s world of global supply and global markets, taking into account the major competitive drivers. The unit discusses supply chain and operations management practices and approaches in a range of contexts.

Procurement and Supply Management

Procurement and Supply Management

introduction

The unit seeks to provide learners with a thorough understanding of procurement and supply management from a strategic, technological, process and relationship perspective. The goal is to provide insights on the role of procurement within supply chain management, the tools and techniques to assess sourcing options, the negotiation and contractual issues encountered with suppliers, effective supplier relationship management and technological enablers in procurement. Learning Outcomes, Assessment Criteria and

Business Research Methods

Business Research Methods

Unit Aims

The aim of this unit is to develop learners’ understanding of research principles including the formulation of research proposals, literature reviews, referencing, data collection using interviews and surveys, questionnaire design, statistical analysing using SPSS, qualitative data, and methods for drawing conclusions from the analysed data.


Logistics Management

Logistics Management

Unit aims

The unit focusses on the strategic, value adding role of logistics in supply networks. It aims to impart learners with a thorough understanding of key theoretical and operational aspects of managing logistics, specifically transportation, storage/warehousing and packaging. The related considerations for business competitiveness and operational efficiency is emphasised as is the interdependency between operational, technological, and regulatory aspects.


The secret of Selling

The secret of Selling

This course introduces students to day 21 of sales management century. The changing dynamics of buyers and sellers are driven by rapid pace The evolution of e-commerce and globalization has led to review and adaptation by organizations Their sales management approach responds to a customer-driven culture. This unit provides a comprehensive overview of sales management and equips students with equipment In today's increasingly complex world, they need tools and knowledge to succeed and a fast-paced sales environment. 

Learning outcomes 

By the end of the module, students will be able to:

1. Demonstrate an understanding of sales management principles.

2. Assess the comparative advantages of the sales structure and identify them The importance of selling through others.

3. Analyze and apply the principles of successful sales.

4. Demonstrate an understanding of sales finance. 



Financial Accounting

Financial Accounting

Introduction

Balancing the books is at the heart of all business management. The overall aim of this unit is to introduce students to essential financial accounting principles and techniques which will enable them to record and prepare basic final accounts. Students will learn how to prepare accounts for sole traders and partnerships as well as limited companies. 

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to contribute effectively to the accounting function of an organisation, or to understand how to record and prepare basic financial accounts for their own business. They will have the knowledge and skills required to progress to a higher level of study.  

Learning Outcomes  

By the end of this unit a student will be able to: 

1 Record business transactions using double entry book-keeping, and be able to extract a trial balance.

2 Prepare final accounts for sole-traders, partnerships and limited companies in accordance with appropriate principles, conventions and standards.

3 Perform bank reconciliations to ensure company and bank records are correct.

4 Reconcile control accounts and shift recorded transactions from the suspense accounts to the right accounts.


Management Accounting (VIP)

Management Accounting (VIP)

Introduction

The overall aim of this unit is to introduce the fundamentals of management accounting which apply to the wider business environment and the organisations which operate within that environment. Students will explore how management accounting uses financial data to aid planning decisions, and the monitoring and control of finance within organisations.

On successful completion of this unit students will be in a position to present financial statements in a workplace context and be able to assist senior colleagues with financial business planning. In addition, students will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to progress onto a higher level of study.  

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

1 Demonstrate an understanding of management accounting systems.

2 Apply a range of management accounting techniques.

3 Explain the use of planning tools used in management accounting.

4 Compare ways in which organisations could use management accounting to respond to financial problems.



Management Accounting

Management Accounting

Introduction

The overall aim of this unit is to introduce the fundamentals of management accounting which apply to the wider business environment and the organisations which operate within that environment. Students will explore how management accounting uses financial data to aid planning decisions, and the monitoring and control of finance within organisations.

On successful completion of this unit students will be in a position to present financial statements in a workplace context and be able to assist senior colleagues with financial business planning. In addition, students will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to progress onto a higher level of study.  

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

1 Demonstrate an understanding of management accounting systems.

2 Apply a range of management accounting techniques.

3 Explain the use of planning tools used in management accounting.

4 Compare ways in which organisations could use management accounting to respond to financial problems.


Human Resource Management (VIP)

Human Resource Management (VIP)

The aim of this unit is to enable students to appreciate and apply principles of effective Human Resource Management (HRM). People are the lifeblood of any organisation and being able to attract, recruit and retain talented staff is at the core of all HRM activity.

This unit will explore the tools and techniques used in HRM to maximise the employee contribution and how to use HR methods to gain competitive advantage. Students will explore the importance of training and development in building and extending the skills base of the organisation and ensuring it is relevant to the ever-changing business environment. Students will also consider the growing importance of becoming a flexible organisation with an equally flexible labour force, and become familiar with techniques of job design and with different reward systems.

The unit investigates the importance of good employee relations and the ways in which employers engage with their staff and possibly with trade unions. Students will gain an understanding of the law governing HRM processes as well as the best practices which enable an employer to become an ‘employer of choice’ in their labour market.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

1 Explain the purpose and scope of Human Resource Management in terms of resourcing an organisation with talent and skills appropriate to fulfil business objectives.

2 Evaluate the effectiveness of the key elements of Human Resource Management in an organisation.

3 Analyse internal and external factors that affect Human Resource Management decision-making, including employment legislation.

4 Apply Human Resource Management practices in a work-related context.


Business Environment (VIP)

Business Environment (VIP)

The aim of this unit is to provide students with background knowledge and understanding of business, the functions of an organisation and the wider business environments in which organisations operate. Students will examine the different types of organisations (including for profit and not for profit), their size and scope (for instance, micro, SME, transnational and global) and how they operate.  

Students will explore the relationships that organisations have with their various stakeholders and how the wider external environments influence and shape business decision-making.  The knowledge, understanding and skill sets gained in this unit will help students to choose their own preferred areas of specialism in future studies and in their professional career.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

1 Explain the different types, size and scope of organisations.

2 Demonstrate the interrelationship of the various functions within an organisation and how they link to organisational structure.

3 Use contemporary examples to demonstrate both the positive and negative influence/impact the macro environment has on business operations.

4 Determine the internal strengths and weaknesses of specific businesses and explain their interrelationship with external macro factors.

Human Resource Management

Human Resource Management

The aim of this unit is to enable students to appreciate and apply principles of effective Human Resource Management (HRM). People are the lifeblood of any organisation and being able to attract, recruit and retain talented staff is at the core of all HRM activity.

This unit will explore the tools and techniques used in HRM to maximise the employee contribution and how to use HR methods to gain competitive advantage. Students will explore the importance of training and development in building and extending the skills base of the organisation and ensuring it is relevant to the ever-changing business environment. Students will also consider the growing importance of becoming a flexible organisation with an equally flexible labour force, and become familiar with techniques of job design and with different reward systems.

The unit investigates the importance of good employee relations and the ways in which employers engage with their staff and possibly with trade unions. Students will gain an understanding of the law governing HRM processes as well as the best practices which enable an employer to become an ‘employer of choice’ in their labour market.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

1 Explain the purpose and scope of Human Resource Management in terms of resourcing an organisation with talent and skills appropriate to fulfil business objectives.

2 Evaluate the effectiveness of the key elements of Human Resource Management in an organisation.

3 Analyse internal and external factors that affect Human Resource Management decision-making, including employment legislation.

4 Apply Human Resource Management practices in a work-related context.

Marketing Essentials

Marketing Essentials

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles of new age marketing, enabling them to develop a basic marketing plan and to employ elements of the marketing mix to achieve results. While they will learn the underpinning theories and frameworks, they will also be able to relate these to real-world examples, including products/services that they encounter in their own daily lives. 

All organisations has at least one thing in common: they all use marketing to influence us to engage with their products and/or services. Whether it is becoming a loyal customer buying a product and service or donating to a charity, organisations use a range of marketing techniques and tools to inform and influence us.

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets that students will gain on successfully completing this unit will enhance their career opportunities; whether setting up their own business or being employed by an organisation.

This course is designed to introduce students to the principles of marketing, enabling them to develop a basic marketing plan and to employ elements of the marketing mix to achieve results. While they will learn the underpinning theories and frameworks, they will also be able to relate these to real-world examples, including products/services that they encounter in their own daily lives.

Organisations such as Apple, Google, VISA, Burberry, Zara, Cadbury, Nestle, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Unicef, BP and small local businesses all have at least one thing in common: they all use marketing to influence us to engage with their products and/or services. Whether it is becoming a loyal customer buying a product and service or donating to a charity, organisations use a range of marketing techniques and tools to inform and influence us.

The knowledge, understanding and skill sets that students will gain on successfully completing this unit will enhance their career opportunities; whether setting up their own business or being employed by an organisation.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

1 Explain the role of marketing and how it interrelates with other functional units of an organisation.

2 Compare ways in which organisations use elements of the marketing mix (7Ps) to achieve overall business objectives.

3 Develop and evaluate a basic marketing plan.

Business Environment

Business Environment

The aim of this unit is to provide students with background knowledge and understanding of business, the functions of an organisation and the wider business environments in which organisations operate. Students will examine the different types of organisations (including for profit and not for profit), their size and scope (for instance, micro, SME, transnational and global) and how they operate.  

Students will explore the relationships that organisations have with their various stakeholders and how the wider external environments influence and shape business decision-making.  The knowledge, understanding and skill sets gained in this unit will help students to choose their own preferred areas of specialism in future studies and in their professional career.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

1 Explain the different types, size and scope of organisations.

2 Demonstrate the interrelationship of the various functions within an organisation and how they link to organisational structure.

3 Use contemporary examples to demonstrate both the positive and negative influence/impact the macro environment has on business operations.

4 Determine the internal strengths and weaknesses of specific businesses and explain their interrelationship with external macro factors.

 Robotic Process Automation

Robotic Process Automation

Welcome to the Complete UiPath RPA Developer Course: Build 7 Robots where you will learn everything you need to know to get started as a Robotic Process Automation (RPA) developer. Learn and master UiPath Studio and then build state-of-the-art software robots from scratch.

The best part about this course is that this course is entirely project-based, which means you will be getting hands-on experience and learn the skills you need on how to build real-world software robots in an enterprise setting. So if you're the type of person who 'learns by doing', then this course is for you.

We start off by learning what RPA is, how to choose the best processes fit for RPA, installing UiPath onto your machine and then building your first simple robot. We then explore UiPath Studio learning all about the user interface to get a basic understanding on how to use UiPath Studio. Once we cover all the basics we then take a deep dive into building real-world software robots ranging in complexity from beginner to advanced. In this course we build the following robots:


Programming (VIP)

Programming (VIP)

Programming involves describing processes and procedures which are derived from algorithms. The ability to program is what sets apart a developer and an end user.

Typically the role of the developer is to instruct a device (such as a computer) to carry out instructions; the instructions are known as source code and is written in a language that is converted into something the device can understand. The device executes the instructions it is given.

Algorithms help to describe the solution to a problem or task; by identifying the data and the process needed to represent the problem or task and the set of steps needed to produce the desired result.

Programming languages typically provide the representation of both the data and the process; they provide control constructs and data types (which can be numbers, words, and objects, and be constant or variable).

The control constructs are used to represent the steps of an algorithm in a convenient yet unambiguous fashion. Algorithms require constructs that can perform sequential processing, selection for decision-making, and iteration for repetitive control. Any programming language that provides these basic features can be used for algorithm representation.

This unit introduces students to the core concepts of programming with an introduction to algorithms and the characteristics of programming paradigms. Among the topics included in this unit are: introduction to algorithms, procedural, object-orientated & event-driven programming, security considerations, the integrated development environment and the debugging process.



Computer Systems Architecture (VIP)

Computer Systems Architecture (VIP)

As technology develops, it is important to have a working foundation on which to build your knowledge. Despite hardware and software being constantly updated and seemingly becoming more complex, students with a solid, underpinned knowledge about computer systems architecture will not only be able to answer questions like, “How does a central processor work?”, “What does an operating system do?”, “How is information stored?”, “What is an instruction set?” and “How do I actually connect to the internet?”, but will also be able to transfer and apply their knowledge and skill to many other areas.

This unit introduces students to the foundations of computer systems architecture together with the integrated hardware and software components and subsystems that enable and allow data to be input, processed and output. The unit further explores the concepts of operating systems, hardware management and computer networks together with the practical skills needed to diagnose, troubleshoot and maintain computer systems taking the security of these systems into consideration.

Among the topics included in this unit are: CPUs, memory, input & output devices, ALU operations, program execution, operating systems (including kernel, file systems, API and system calls), hardware management, installation, firmware, device drivers, networking (including OSI and TCP/IP models), error and information gathering, fault diagnostics, security and problem resolution.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to explain the purpose and role of operating systems, the relationship between the subsystems embedded within a central processing unit, the core hardware and software components associated with computer operations and be able to configure the hardware and systems needed to establish a computer network together with practical diagnostic and troubleshooting techniques. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Explain the relationships between hardware components and the subsystems used in a computer system.

LO2 Categorise the key features and services provided by different computer operating systems and hardware.

LO3 Use network communication technology and the associated services to connect computer systems.

LO4 Demonstrate diagnostic and troubleshooting skills to solve hardware, software and networking related issues.



Computing Research Project (VIP)

Computing Research Project (VIP)

Introduction 

This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. Students will choose their own project based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The project must be related to their specialist pathway of study (unless the student is studying the general computing pathway). This will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of computing in the context of a business environment and their chosen specialist pathway. The aim of this unit is to offer students the opportunity to engage in sustained research in a specific field of study. The unit enables students to demonstrate the capacity and ability to identify a research theme, to develop research aims, objectives and outcomes, and to present the outcomes of such research in both written and verbal formats. The unit also encourages students to reflect on their engagement in the research process during which recommendations for future, personal development are key learning points. On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in problem-solving and research activities which are part of the function of a manager. Students will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate workplace issues and problems, determine appropriate solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, reasoning and interpretation which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.  

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Examine appropriate research methodologies and approaches as part of the research process.

LO2 Conduct and analyse research relevant to a computing research project.

LO3 Communicate the outcomes of a research project to identified stakeholders.

LO4 Reflect on the application of research methodologies and concepts.



Computing Research Project

Computing Research Project

Introduction 

This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. Students will choose their own project based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The project must be related to their specialist pathway of study (unless the student is studying the general computing pathway). This will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of computing in the context of a business environment and their chosen specialist pathway. The aim of this unit is to offer students the opportunity to engage in sustained research in a specific field of study. The unit enables students to demonstrate the capacity and ability to identify a research theme, to develop research aims, objectives and outcomes, and to present the outcomes of such research in both written and verbal formats. The unit also encourages students to reflect on their engagement in the research process during which recommendations for future, personal development are key learning points. On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in problem-solving and research activities which are part of the function of a manager. Students will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate workplace issues and problems, determine appropriate solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, reasoning and interpretation which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.  

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Examine appropriate research methodologies and approaches as part of the research process.

LO2 Conduct and analyse research relevant to a computing research project.

LO3 Communicate the outcomes of a research project to identified stakeholders.

LO4 Reflect on the application of research methodologies and concepts.


Managing a Successful Computing Project

Managing a Successful Computing Project

Introduction

This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. The project brief will be set by the centre, based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The theme and chosen project within the theme will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of computing in the context of a business environment. In order to ensure that client expectations are met in terms of requirements, deadlines and the estimated cost, the work to deliver new computer systems or services to business organisations, or to revamp the existing ones, is always organised in projects. Therefore, skilful, knowledgeable and experienced project managers have always been in demand. It is projected that 15.7 million new project management roles will be created around the world by 2020.

The aim of this unit is to offer students an opportunity to demonstrate the skills required for managing and implementing a project. They will undertake independent research and investigation for carrying out and executing a computing project which meets appropriate aims and objectives.

On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in decision-making, problem-solving and research activities using project management skills. They will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate and examine relevant computing concepts within a work-related context, determine appropriate outcomes, decisions or solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Establish project aims, objectives and timeframes based on the chosen theme.

LO2 Conduct small-scale research, information gathering and data collection to generate knowledge to support the project.

LO3 Present the project and communicate appropriate recommendations based on meaningful conclusions drawn from the evidence findings and/or analysis.

LO4 Reflect on the value gained from conducting the project and its usefulness to support sustainable organisational performance.



Managing a Successful Computing Project (VIP)

Managing a Successful Computing Project (VIP)

Introduction

This unit is assessed by a Pearson-set assignment. The project brief will be set by the centre, based on a theme provided by Pearson (this will change annually). The theme and chosen project within the theme will enable students to explore and examine a relevant and current topical aspect of computing in the context of a business environment. In order to ensure that client expectations are met in terms of requirements, deadlines and the estimated cost, the work to deliver new computer systems or services to business organisations, or to revamp the existing ones, is always organised in projects. Therefore, skilful, knowledgeable and experienced project managers have always been in demand. It is projected that 15.7 million new project management roles will be created around the world by 2020.

The aim of this unit is to offer students an opportunity to demonstrate the skills required for managing and implementing a project. They will undertake independent research and investigation for carrying out and executing a computing project which meets appropriate aims and objectives.

On successful completion of this unit students will have the confidence to engage in decision-making, problem-solving and research activities using project management skills. They will have the fundamental knowledge and skills to enable them to investigate and examine relevant computing concepts within a work-related context, determine appropriate outcomes, decisions or solutions and present evidence to various stakeholders in an acceptable and understandable format.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Establish project aims, objectives and timeframes based on the chosen theme.

LO2 Conduct small-scale research, information gathering and data collection to generate knowledge to support the project.

LO3 Present the project and communicate appropriate recommendations based on meaningful conclusions drawn from the evidence findings and/or analysis.

LO4 Reflect on the value gained from conducting the project and its usefulness to support sustainable organisational performance.


Professional Practice (VIP)

Professional Practice (VIP)

Introduction

The need to be effective as a communicator, critical thinker, analyser, team worker and interpreter is essential. Within the workplace these skills are needed on a daily basis to show proficiency in designated tasks as part of a job role. The development of academic competence, and also the continuation of life-long learning and Continuing Professional Development (CPD), is required to ensure that individuals have a valued set of interpersonal skills that can be applied to any situation or environment.

This unit provides a foundation for good practice in a variety of contexts. The ability to communicate effectively using different tools and mediums will ensure that practical, research, design, reporting and presentation tasks are undertaken professionally and in accordance with various communication conventions.

In everyday life the ability to apply critical reasoning and solve problems are necessary skills to enable task resolution and facilitate effective decision-making. Working with others in a group environment academically or within the workplace is an integral part of everyday life. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of teams in terms of culture, roles and responsibilities will ensure that there is a better understanding and awareness of the importance and value of teamwork.

Continuing professional development, self improvement and working towards various goals is an area that is encouraged in the workplace through the appraisals framework. In addition, professional development extends into higher levels of learning and the need to demonstrate effective research skills and academic reporting skills is also required.

Among the topics included in this unit are: the development of communication skills and communication literacy; the use of qualitative and quantitative data to demonstrate analysis, reasoning and critical thinking; and tasks that require the integration of others within a team-based scenario and planning and problem-solving.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate leadership skills through the dynamics of team working, and through reflective practice be able to evaluate the contributions made as an individual and also of others. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.  

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Demonstrate a range of interpersonal and transferable communication skills to a target audience.

LO2 Apply critical reasoning and thinking to a range of problem-solving scenarios.

LO3 Discuss the importance and dynamics of working within a team and the impact of team working in different environments.

LO4 Examine the need for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and its role within the workplace and for higher level learning.  



Professional Practice

Professional Practice

Introduction

The need to be effective as a communicator, critical thinker, analyser, team worker and interpreter is essential. Within the workplace these skills are needed on a daily basis to show proficiency in designated tasks as part of a job role. The development of academic competence, and also the continuation of life-long learning and Continuing Professional Development (CPD), is required to ensure that individuals have a valued set of interpersonal skills that can be applied to any situation or environment.

This unit provides a foundation for good practice in a variety of contexts. The ability to communicate effectively using different tools and mediums will ensure that practical, research, design, reporting and presentation tasks are undertaken professionally and in accordance with various communication conventions.

In everyday life the ability to apply critical reasoning and solve problems are necessary skills to enable task resolution and facilitate effective decision-making. Working with others in a group environment academically or within the workplace is an integral part of everyday life. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of teams in terms of culture, roles and responsibilities will ensure that there is a better understanding and awareness of the importance and value of teamwork.

Continuing professional development, self improvement and working towards various goals is an area that is encouraged in the workplace through the appraisals framework. In addition, professional development extends into higher levels of learning and the need to demonstrate effective research skills and academic reporting skills is also required.

Among the topics included in this unit are: the development of communication skills and communication literacy; the use of qualitative and quantitative data to demonstrate analysis, reasoning and critical thinking; and tasks that require the integration of others within a team-based scenario and planning and problem-solving.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate leadership skills through the dynamics of team working, and through reflective practice be able to evaluate the contributions made as an individual and also of others. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.  

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Demonstrate a range of interpersonal and transferable communication skills to a target audience.

LO2 Apply critical reasoning and thinking to a range of problem-solving scenarios.

LO3 Discuss the importance and dynamics of working within a team and the impact of team working in different environments.

LO4 Examine the need for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) and its role within the workplace and for higher level learning.  


Prototyping (VIP)

Prototyping (VIP)

Introduction 

A prototype is the first or early sample, model or demonstration version of a concept, design or idea used to test functionality and gather feedback. The objective of prototyping is to build a functional and demonstrable version of a concept and use this version to evaluate different aspects of the concept with end users. A prototype may test a single or multiple facets of a concept and can range in functionality from very basic design mock-ups to fully functional features within complex software applications.

This unit introduces students to the role, basic concepts and benefits of prototyping in the design and development process of software applications. The aim of this unit is to enhance a student’s understanding of the methodology, terminology and benefits of prototyping in the design and development of secure software applications. Among the topics included in this unit are: classification and terminology of prototyping tools and techniques, the relationship between prototypes and release candidate software applications, how prototypes differ from release candidate software applications, categorising prototypes by their intended target end user, functionality and testing requirements, methods of prototyping, most appropriate forms of prototype for the different categories of testing, gathering meaningful insights and results from prototype testing, software release lifecycle and software prototyping concepts.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to explain the basic concepts of prototyping; plan, build and measure the success of an appropriate prototype with a specific end user in mind; and conduct testing to gather meaningful feedback and data to improve a prototype or final software application. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, team working, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, business skills, computer software literacy and language, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1. Explore forms of prototypes appropriate for various functionality and end user testing requirements.

LO2. Plan a prototype for specific target end users and planned tests.

LO3. Develop multiple iterations of the prototype using appropriate tools.

LO4. Evaluate user feedback and test results from multiple iterations of the prototype and end user testing.


Prototyping

Prototyping

Introduction 

A prototype is the first or early sample, model or demonstration version of a concept, design or idea used to test functionality and gather feedback. The objective of prototyping is to build a functional and demonstrable version of a concept and use this version to evaluate different aspects of the concept with end users. A prototype may test a single or multiple facets of a concept and can range in functionality from very basic design mock-ups to fully functional features within complex software applications.

This unit introduces students to the role, basic concepts and benefits of prototyping in the design and development process of software applications. The aim of this unit is to enhance a student’s understanding of the methodology, terminology and benefits of prototyping in the design and development of secure software applications. Among the topics included in this unit are: classification and terminology of prototyping tools and techniques, the relationship between prototypes and release candidate software applications, how prototypes differ from release candidate software applications, categorising prototypes by their intended target end user, functionality and testing requirements, methods of prototyping, most appropriate forms of prototype for the different categories of testing, gathering meaningful insights and results from prototype testing, software release lifecycle and software prototyping concepts.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to explain the basic concepts of prototyping; plan, build and measure the success of an appropriate prototype with a specific end user in mind; and conduct testing to gather meaningful feedback and data to improve a prototype or final software application. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, team working, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, business skills, computer software literacy and language, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1. Explore forms of prototypes appropriate for various functionality and end user testing requirements.

LO2. Plan a prototype for specific target end users and planned tests.

LO3. Develop multiple iterations of the prototype using appropriate tools.

LO4. Evaluate user feedback and test results from multiple iterations of the prototype and end user testing.

Database Design & Development (VIP)

Database Design & Development (VIP)

Introduction

Organisations depend on their databases to provide information essential for their day-to-day operations and to help them take advantage of today's rapidly growing and maturing e-commerce opportunities. An understanding of database tools and technologies is an essential skill for designing and developing systems to support them. 

Database systems continue to demand more complex data structures and interfaces, as applications get increasingly sophisticated. Most organisations collect and store large volumes of data, either on their own systems or in the cloud, and this data is used not just for the operational running of their business but also mined for other more intelligent and complex applications.

Databases stand as the back-end of most systems used by organisations for their operations. Database design and development is a fundamental and highly beneficial skill for computing students to master, regardless of their specialism. The aim of this unit is to give students opportunities to develop an understanding of the concepts and issues relating to database design and development, as well as to provide the practical skills to translate that understanding into the design and creation of complex databases.

Topics included in this unit are: examination of different design tools and techniques; examination of different development software options; considering the development features of a fully functional robust solution covering data integrity, data validation, data consistency, data security and advanced database querying facilities across multiple tables; appropriate user interfaces for databases and for other externally linked systems; creating complex reports/dashboards, testing the system against the user and system requirements; and elements of complete system documentation.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to use appropriate tools to design and develop a relational database system for a substantial problem. They will be able to test the system to ensure it meets user and system requirements and fully document the system by providing technical and user documentation.

For practical purposes, this unit covers relational databases and related tools and techniques. A brief overview of object-oriented databases will also be covered. Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1. Use an appropriate design tool to design a relational database system for a substantial problem.

LO2. Develop a fully functional relational database system, based on an existing system design.

LO3. Test the system against user and system requirements.

LO4. Produce technical and user documentation.  



Database Design & Development

Database Design & Development

Introduction

Organisations depend on their databases to provide information essential for their day-to-day operations and to help them take advantage of today's rapidly growing and maturing e-commerce opportunities. An understanding of database tools and technologies is an essential skill for designing and developing systems to support them. 

Database systems continue to demand more complex data structures and interfaces, as applications get increasingly sophisticated. Most organisations collect and store large volumes of data, either on their own systems or in the cloud, and this data is used not just for the operational running of their business but also mined for other more intelligent and complex applications.

Databases stand as the back-end of most systems used by organisations for their operations. Database design and development is a fundamental and highly beneficial skill for computing students to master, regardless of their specialism. The aim of this unit is to give students opportunities to develop an understanding of the concepts and issues relating to database design and development, as well as to provide the practical skills to translate that understanding into the design and creation of complex databases.

Topics included in this unit are: examination of different design tools and techniques; examination of different development software options; considering the development features of a fully functional robust solution covering data integrity, data validation, data consistency, data security and advanced database querying facilities across multiple tables; appropriate user interfaces for databases and for other externally linked systems; creating complex reports/dashboards, testing the system against the user and system requirements; and elements of complete system documentation.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to use appropriate tools to design and develop a relational database system for a substantial problem. They will be able to test the system to ensure it meets user and system requirements and fully document the system by providing technical and user documentation.

For practical purposes, this unit covers relational databases and related tools and techniques. A brief overview of object-oriented databases will also be covered. Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1. Use an appropriate design tool to design a relational database system for a substantial problem.

LO2. Develop a fully functional relational database system, based on an existing system design.

LO3. Test the system against user and system requirements.

LO4. Produce technical and user documentation.  


E-Commerce & Strategy (VIP)

E-Commerce & Strategy (VIP)

Introduction

Electronic Commerce, or E-Commerce, refers to any type of commercial/business transaction where information, data, products and services are exchanged across the internet. These transactions can cover a wide diversity of business types to include: consumer-based retail sites (e.g. Amazon), sites that provide facilities such as auctions (e.g. eBay) and business exchanges between different organisations. E-Commerce allows consumers to electronically exchange goods and services 24/7 with no barriers in terms of time or geography. Within this unit students will gain an understanding of how and why businesses and organisations develop E-Commerce strategies: to remain competitive in the global market.

Students will also appreciate the elements and resources required to set up an E-Commerce site and be engaged in the design and implementation of their own strategies that would in reality form part of a secure E-Commerce site. Students will examine the impact that E-Commerce has on society and the global market for consumers, buyers and sellers in terms of the benefits and drawbacks of online purchasing.

Through investigation, students will also research the technologies involved in setting up a secure E-Commerce site in preparation for their own ECommerce strategy. There is an expectation that students will devise a strategy based on an element of ECommerce such as designing a shopping cart, an ordering system, payment system or an online marketing system, for example.

This design should be fully implemented and evaluated accordingly in terms of its success or failure. Standards and levels of support, marketing, CRM, promotion and supply chain management will all be explored within the context of developing the implementation strategy. On successful completion of this unit a student will have gained both a technical and practical insight into E-Commerce strategy, design and development. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

ü  LO1. Examine the strategies employed and the impact of E-Commerce on business organisations.

ü  LO2. Analyse the hardware, software, web-based and database technologies involved in setting up a secure E-Commerce site.

ü  LO3. Design an E-Commerce strategy based on a given end user requirement or specification. LO4. Implement an E-Commerce strategy based on a given end user requirement or specification.



E-Commerce & Strategy

E-Commerce & Strategy

Introduction

Electronic Commerce, or E-Commerce, refers to any type of commercial/business transaction where information, data, products and services are exchanged across the internet. These transactions can cover a wide diversity of business types to include: consumer-based retail sites (e.g. Amazon), sites that provide facilities such as auctions (e.g. eBay) and business exchanges between different organisations. E-Commerce allows consumers to electronically exchange goods and services 24/7 with no barriers in terms of time or geography. Within this unit students will gain an understanding of how and why businesses and organisations develop E-Commerce strategies: to remain competitive in the global market.

Students will also appreciate the elements and resources required to set up an E-Commerce site and be engaged in the design and implementation of their own strategies that would in reality form part of a secure E-Commerce site. Students will examine the impact that E-Commerce has on society and the global market for consumers, buyers and sellers in terms of the benefits and drawbacks of online purchasing.

Through investigation, students will also research the technologies involved in setting up a secure E-Commerce site in preparation for their own ECommerce strategy. There is an expectation that students will devise a strategy based on an element of ECommerce such as designing a shopping cart, an ordering system, payment system or an online marketing system, for example.

This design should be fully implemented and evaluated accordingly in terms of its success or failure. Standards and levels of support, marketing, CRM, promotion and supply chain management will all be explored within the context of developing the implementation strategy. On successful completion of this unit a student will have gained both a technical and practical insight into E-Commerce strategy, design and development. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

ü  LO1. Examine the strategies employed and the impact of E-Commerce on business organisations.

ü  LO2. Analyse the hardware, software, web-based and database technologies involved in setting up a secure E-Commerce site.

ü  LO3. Design an E-Commerce strategy based on a given end user requirement or specification. LO4. Implement an E-Commerce strategy based on a given end user requirement or specification.


Business Intelligence (VIP)

Business Intelligence (VIP)

Introduction

Data and information is core to any organisation and business process. The necessity of having meaningful information is the key driver for effective decision-making and problem-solving. Business intelligence has evolved from technologies such as decision support systems (DSS) to include tools and methods associated with data mining, data integration, data quality and data warehousing in conjunction with other information management systems and applications.

This unit introduces students to a range of tools, techniques and technologies for acquiring data and processing this into meaningful information that can be used to support business functions and processes.

Within this unit students will examine the concept of business processing in terms of data capture, conversion and information output. Students will also be required to define the tools and technologies associated with business intelligence functionality.

The use of a business intelligence tool/s and techniques is also required to demonstrate an understanding of a given problem. Finally, students will be expected to evaluate the impact of business intelligence for effective decision-making.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to appreciate the importance of business intelligence in terms of optimising decision-making and performance. By exploring the tools, techniques and systems that support business intelligence students will have an awareness of the role and contribution that these technologies and methodologies have and their importance to organisations.

As a result students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Discuss business processes and the mechanisms used to support business decision-making.

LO2 Compare the tools and technologies associated with business intelligence functionality.

LO3 Demonstrate the use of business intelligence tools and technologies.

LO4 Discuss the impact of business intelligence tools and technologies for effective decision-making purposes and the legal/regulatory context in which they are used.


Business Intelligence

Business Intelligence

Introduction

Data and information is core to any organisation and business process. The necessity of having meaningful information is the key driver for effective decision-making and problem-solving. Business intelligence has evolved from technologies such as decision support systems (DSS) to include tools and methods associated with data mining, data integration, data quality and data warehousing in conjunction with other information management systems and applications.

This unit introduces students to a range of tools, techniques and technologies for acquiring data and processing this into meaningful information that can be used to support business functions and processes.

Within this unit students will examine the concept of business processing in terms of data capture, conversion and information output. Students will also be required to define the tools and technologies associated with business intelligence functionality.

The use of a business intelligence tool/s and techniques is also required to demonstrate an understanding of a given problem. Finally, students will be expected to evaluate the impact of business intelligence for effective decision-making.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to appreciate the importance of business intelligence in terms of optimising decision-making and performance. By exploring the tools, techniques and systems that support business intelligence students will have an awareness of the role and contribution that these technologies and methodologies have and their importance to organisations.

As a result students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Discuss business processes and the mechanisms used to support business decision-making.

LO2 Compare the tools and technologies associated with business intelligence functionality.

LO3 Demonstrate the use of business intelligence tools and technologies.

LO4 Discuss the impact of business intelligence tools and technologies for effective decision-making purposes and the legal/regulatory context in which they are used.

Data Structures & Algorithms (VIP)

Data Structures & Algorithms (VIP)

Introduction

The knowledge to implement algorithms and data structures that solve real problems, and knowing the purpose, complexity and use of algorithms is part of an essential toolkit for software engineers. An algorithm is a sequence of instructions used to manipulate data held in a structured form and together constitute design patterns for solving a diverse range of computer problems, including network analysis, cryptography, data compression and process control.

This unit introduces students to data structures and how they are used in algorithms, enabling them to design and implement data structures. The unit introduces the specification of abstract data types and explores their use in concrete data structures. Based on this knowledge, students should be able to develop solutions by specifying, designing and implementing data structures and algorithms in a variety of programming paradigms for an identified need.

Among the topics included in this unit are abstract data types specification, formal data notations, data encapsulation, complex data structures, programming language implementations using handles, pointers, classes and methods, algorithm types, data structure libraries, algorithm complexity, asymptotic testing and benchmarking. On completion of this unit the student should be able to identify program data requirements, specify abstract data types using a formal notation, translate into concrete data structures and be able to develop, using a programming paradigm, different sorting, searching and navigational algorithms that implement complex data structures and evaluate their effectiveness.

As a result of studying this unit students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the unit students will be able to:

LO1. Examine abstract data types, concrete data structures and algorithms.

LO2. Specify abstract data types and algorithms in a formal notation.

LO3. Implement complex data structures and algorithms.

LO4. Assess the effectiveness of data structures and algorithms.


Strategic Information Systems (VIP)

Strategic Information Systems (VIP)

Introduction

Information is the most valuable resource that an organisation possesses. The effective gathering, protection, analysis, processing and dissemination of information is vital to the success of any organisation. As globalisation and the 24-hour economy develop and increase, organisations must ensure that their information systems are reliable, efficient and able to cope with rapid change. This unit introduces students to the importance of information to organisations.

 It will examine how systems can be used to support core business functions and enable organisations to be more productive and competitive within the global marketplace. Students will be required to analyse the information needs of an organisation at different levels and within different functional areas. It is important that computing professionals are able to understand how an organisation works and how it uses information in order to be able to design, implement, maintain and manage secure information systems to support its operations. Among the topics included in this unit are understanding organisations in terms of their information needs and the variances within different functional areas. Examination of different information systems at the operational, tactical and strategic levels will be required, in addition to evaluating their effectiveness and role in terms of decision making and gaining competitive advantage.

 On successful completion of this unit students will have an insight into the types of systems and technologies available for effective information processing. Critical analysis will also be used to examine the integrated role that each of these play in contributing to the efficiency and competitiveness of organisations. As a result students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Analyse the information requirements of organisations.

LO2 Discuss the types of information systems that are used within all levels of an organisation.

LO3 Demonstrate the use of an information system to produce management information.

LO4 Evaluate the effectiveness of strategic information systems.


Data Structures & Algorithms

Data Structures & Algorithms

Introduction

The knowledge to implement algorithms and data structures that solve real problems, and knowing the purpose, complexity and use of algorithms is part of an essential toolkit for software engineers. An algorithm is a sequence of instructions used to manipulate data held in a structured form and together constitute design patterns for solving a diverse range of computer problems, including network analysis, cryptography, data compression and process control.

This unit introduces students to data structures and how they are used in algorithms, enabling them to design and implement data structures. The unit introduces the specification of abstract data types and explores their use in concrete data structures. Based on this knowledge, students should be able to develop solutions by specifying, designing and implementing data structures and algorithms in a variety of programming paradigms for an identified need.

Among the topics included in this unit are abstract data types specification, formal data notations, data encapsulation, complex data structures, programming language implementations using handles, pointers, classes and methods, algorithm types, data structure libraries, algorithm complexity, asymptotic testing and benchmarking. On completion of this unit the student should be able to identify program data requirements, specify abstract data types using a formal notation, translate into concrete data structures and be able to develop, using a programming paradigm, different sorting, searching and navigational algorithms that implement complex data structures and evaluate their effectiveness.

As a result of studying this unit students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, synthesis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the unit students will be able to:

LO1. Examine abstract data types, concrete data structures and algorithms.

LO2. Specify abstract data types and algorithms in a formal notation.

LO3. Implement complex data structures and algorithms.

LO4. Assess the effectiveness of data structures and algorithms.

Strategic Information Systems

Strategic Information Systems

Introduction

Information is the most valuable resource that an organisation possesses. The effective gathering, protection, analysis, processing and dissemination of information is vital to the success of any organisation. As globalisation and the 24-hour economy develop and increase, organisations must ensure that their information systems are reliable, efficient and able to cope with rapid change. This unit introduces students to the importance of information to organisations.

 It will examine how systems can be used to support core business functions and enable organisations to be more productive and competitive within the global marketplace. Students will be required to analyse the information needs of an organisation at different levels and within different functional areas. It is important that computing professionals are able to understand how an organisation works and how it uses information in order to be able to design, implement, maintain and manage secure information systems to support its operations. Among the topics included in this unit are understanding organisations in terms of their information needs and the variances within different functional areas. Examination of different information systems at the operational, tactical and strategic levels will be required, in addition to evaluating their effectiveness and role in terms of decision making and gaining competitive advantage.

 On successful completion of this unit students will have an insight into the types of systems and technologies available for effective information processing. Critical analysis will also be used to examine the integrated role that each of these play in contributing to the efficiency and competitiveness of organisations. As a result students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Analyse the information requirements of organisations.

LO2 Discuss the types of information systems that are used within all levels of an organisation.

LO3 Demonstrate the use of an information system to produce management information.

LO4 Evaluate the effectiveness of strategic information systems.

Security (VIP)

Security (VIP)

Introduction

Introduction Security is one of the most important challenges modern organisations face. Security is about protecting organisational assets, including personnel, data, equipment and networks from attack through the use of prevention techniques in the form of vulnerability testing/security policies and detection techniques, exposing breaches in security and implementing effective responses. The aim of this unit is to provide students with knowledge of security, associated risks and how security breaches impact on business continuity. Students will examine security measures involving access authorisation, regulation of use, implementing contingency plans and devising security policies and procedures. This unit introduces students to the detection of threats and vulnerabilities in physical and IT security, and how to manage risks relating to organisational security. Among the topics included in this unit are Network Security design and operational topics, including address translation, DMZ, VPN, firewalls, AV and intrusion detection systems. Remote access will be covered, as will the need for frequent vulnerability testing as part of organisational and security audit compliance. Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Assess risks to IT security.

LO2 Describe IT security solutions.

LO3 Review mechanisms to control organisational IT security.

LO4 Manage organisational security.


Systems Analysis & Design

Systems Analysis & Design

Introduction

The world is constantly changing, with new and emerging digital technologies bringing many challenges to the commercial world. Organisations have to respond to these changes in addition to responding to new markets and different ways of doing their business. The systems they use to run their businesses have to respond quickly to these transformations. Organisations can find themselves in a situation where they have to regularly upgrade old systems or develop new ones in order to continue operating successfully in the evolving competitive business environment. Before any system can be upgraded or a new system developed, the system requirements have to be analysed and the system designed, whether this is for a database system, or a web, game or mobile application, and failure to do this adequately could lead to a costly systems failure.

This unit explores the processes of systems analysis and design using two methodologies – the traditional systems development lifecycle methodology providing a comprehensive structured framework and the agile methodology with different framework models developed with the emphasis on variations of iterative incremental modelling. To provide perspective, students will examine the models in both these methodologies. They will consider the particular strengths and weaknesses of the two methodologies and examine the suitability of the methodologies using different examples. Topics included in this unit are: examining the business case for a new system or for upgrading an existing one, looking at traditional and agile systems analysis methodologies and evaluating the merits of each, considering the implications of moving from using the traditional methods of analysis and design to agile methods on analysts, designers and developers in an organisation, and applying systems design tools and techniques.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to produce a business case, and analyse a system and its requirements using a suitable methodology. They will be able to design a system suitable for their application. Theoretical understanding will be translated into practical skills through actual systems investigations and students will become confident in the use of particular tools and techniques relevant to the methodology chosen. Although for practical purposes, it is likely that one particular methodology and related tools and techniques will be used, it is important that students understand that others are available. As a result students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the unit students will be able to:

LO1. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the traditional and agile systems analysis methodologies.

LO2. Produce a feasibility study for a system for a business-related problem.

LO3. Analyse their system using a suitable methodology.

LO4. Design the system to meet user and system requirements.

Systems Analysis & Design (VIP)

Systems Analysis & Design (VIP)

Introduction

The world is constantly changing, with new and emerging digital technologies bringing many challenges to the commercial world. Organisations have to respond to these changes in addition to responding to new markets and different ways of doing their business. The systems they use to run their businesses have to respond quickly to these transformations. Organisations can find themselves in a situation where they have to regularly upgrade old systems or develop new ones in order to continue operating successfully in the evolving competitive business environment. Before any system can be upgraded or a new system developed, the system requirements have to be analysed and the system designed, whether this is for a database system, or a web, game or mobile application, and failure to do this adequately could lead to a costly systems failure.

This unit explores the processes of systems analysis and design using two methodologies – the traditional systems development lifecycle methodology providing a comprehensive structured framework and the agile methodology with different framework models developed with the emphasis on variations of iterative incremental modelling. To provide perspective, students will examine the models in both these methodologies. They will consider the particular strengths and weaknesses of the two methodologies and examine the suitability of the methodologies using different examples. Topics included in this unit are: examining the business case for a new system or for upgrading an existing one, looking at traditional and agile systems analysis methodologies and evaluating the merits of each, considering the implications of moving from using the traditional methods of analysis and design to agile methods on analysts, designers and developers in an organisation, and applying systems design tools and techniques.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to produce a business case, and analyse a system and its requirements using a suitable methodology. They will be able to design a system suitable for their application. Theoretical understanding will be translated into practical skills through actual systems investigations and students will become confident in the use of particular tools and techniques relevant to the methodology chosen. Although for practical purposes, it is likely that one particular methodology and related tools and techniques will be used, it is important that students understand that others are available. As a result students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of the unit students will be able to:

LO1. Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of the traditional and agile systems analysis methodologies.

LO2. Produce a feasibility study for a system for a business-related problem.

LO3. Analyse their system using a suitable methodology.

LO4. Design the system to meet user and system requirements.


Security

Security

Introduction

Introduction Security is one of the most important challenges modern organisations face. Security is about protecting organisational assets, including personnel, data, equipment and networks from attack through the use of prevention techniques in the form of vulnerability testing/security policies and detection techniques, exposing breaches in security and implementing effective responses. The aim of this unit is to provide students with knowledge of security, associated risks and how security breaches impact on business continuity. Students will examine security measures involving access authorisation, regulation of use, implementing contingency plans and devising security policies and procedures. This unit introduces students to the detection of threats and vulnerabilities in physical and IT security, and how to manage risks relating to organisational security. Among the topics included in this unit are Network Security design and operational topics, including address translation, DMZ, VPN, firewalls, AV and intrusion detection systems. Remote access will be covered, as will the need for frequent vulnerability testing as part of organisational and security audit compliance. Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Assess risks to IT security.

LO2 Describe IT security solutions.

LO3 Review mechanisms to control organisational IT security.

LO4 Manage organisational security.

Discrete Maths (VIP)

Discrete Maths (VIP)

Digital computer technologies operate with distinct steps, and data is stored within as separate bits. This method of finite operation is known as ‘discrete’, and the division of mathematics that describes computer science concepts such as software development, programming languages, and cryptography is known as ‘discrete mathematics’. This branch of mathematics is a major part of computer science courses and ultimately aids in the development of logical thinking and reasoning that lies at the core of all digital technology.

This unit introduces students to the discrete mathematical principles and theory that underpin software engineering. Through a series of case studies, scenarios and tasked-based assessments students will explore set theory and functions within a variety of scenarios; perform analysis using graph theory; apply Boolean algebra to applicable scenarios; and finally explore additional concepts within abstract algebra.

Among the topics included in this unit are: set theory and functions, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, binary problems, Boolean equations, Algebraic structures and group theory.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to gain confidence with the relevant discrete mathematics needed to successfully understand software engineering concepts. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1. Examine set theory and functions applicable to software engineering.

LO2. Analyse mathematical structures of objects using graph theory.

LO3 Investigate solutions to problem situations using the application of Boolean algebra.

LO4. Explore applicable concepts within abstract algebra.



Networking (VIP)

Networking (VIP)

Computer networks are the driving force behind the evolution of computer systems and allow users to access data, hardware and services regardless of their location.

Being knowledgeable about the underlying principles of networking is of vital importance to all IT professionals. Networking is an environment that is increasingly complex and under continuous development. 

Complex computer networking has connected the world by groups of small networks through internet links to support global communications. It supports access to digital information anytime, anywhere using many applications like e-mail, audio and video transmission, including the World Wide Web, and this has opened the floodgates to the availability of information.

The aim of this unit is to provide students with wider background knowledge of computer networking essentials, how they operate, protocols, standards, security considerations and the prototypes associated with a range of networking technologies.

Students will explore a range of hardware, with related software, and will configure and install these to gain knowledge of networking systems. A range of networking technologies will be explored to deliver a fundamental knowledge of Local Area Networking (LAN), Wide Area Networking (WAN) and their evolution to form largescale networks and the protocol methodologies related to IP data networks will be explored.

On successful completion of this unit students will gain knowledge and skills to successfully install, operate and troubleshoot a small network; and the operation of IP data networks, router, switching technologies, IP routing technologies, IP services and basic troubleshooting. Supporting a range of units in the Higher National suite, this unit underpins the principles of networks for all and enables students to work towards their studies in vendor units, if applicable.

Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.



Discrete Maths

Discrete Maths

Digital computer technologies operate with distinct steps, and data is stored within as separate bits. This method of finite operation is known as ‘discrete’, and the division of mathematics that describes computer science concepts such as software development, programming languages, and cryptography is known as ‘discrete mathematics’. This branch of mathematics is a major part of computer science courses and ultimately aids in the development of logical thinking and reasoning that lies at the core of all digital technology.

This unit introduces students to the discrete mathematical principles and theory that underpin software engineering. Through a series of case studies, scenarios and tasked-based assessments students will explore set theory and functions within a variety of scenarios; perform analysis using graph theory; apply Boolean algebra to applicable scenarios; and finally explore additional concepts within abstract algebra.

Among the topics included in this unit are: set theory and functions, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, binary problems, Boolean equations, Algebraic structures and group theory.

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to gain confidence with the relevant discrete mathematics needed to successfully understand software engineering concepts. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1. Examine set theory and functions applicable to software engineering.

LO2. Analyse mathematical structures of objects using graph theory.

LO3 Investigate solutions to problem situations using the application of Boolean algebra.

LO4. Explore applicable concepts within abstract algebra.


Networking

Networking

Computer networks are the driving force behind the evolution of computer systems and allow users to access data, hardware and services regardless of their location.

Being knowledgeable about the underlying principles of networking is of vital importance to all IT professionals. Networking is an environment that is increasingly complex and under continuous development. 

Complex computer networking has connected the world by groups of small networks through internet links to support global communications. It supports access to digital information anytime, anywhere using many applications like e-mail, audio and video transmission, including the World Wide Web, and this has opened the floodgates to the availability of information.

The aim of this unit is to provide students with wider background knowledge of computer networking essentials, how they operate, protocols, standards, security considerations and the prototypes associated with a range of networking technologies.

Students will explore a range of hardware, with related software, and will configure and install these to gain knowledge of networking systems. A range of networking technologies will be explored to deliver a fundamental knowledge of Local Area Networking (LAN), Wide Area Networking (WAN) and their evolution to form largescale networks and the protocol methodologies related to IP data networks will be explored.

On successful completion of this unit students will gain knowledge and skills to successfully install, operate and troubleshoot a small network; and the operation of IP data networks, router, switching technologies, IP routing technologies, IP services and basic troubleshooting. Supporting a range of units in the Higher National suite, this unit underpins the principles of networks for all and enables students to work towards their studies in vendor units, if applicable.

Students will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation, which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.


Computer Systems Architecture

Computer Systems Architecture

As technology develops, it is important to have a working foundation on which to build your knowledge. Despite hardware and software being constantly updated and seemingly becoming more complex, students with a solid, underpinned knowledge about computer systems architecture will not only be able to answer questions like, “How does a central processor work?”, “What does an operating system do?”, “How is information stored?”, “What is an instruction set?” and “How do I actually connect to the internet?”, but will also be able to transfer and apply their knowledge and skill to many other areas.

This unit introduces students to the foundations of computer systems architecture together with the integrated hardware and software components and subsystems that enable and allow data to be input, processed and output. The unit further explores the concepts of operating systems, hardware management and computer networks together with the practical skills needed to diagnose, troubleshoot and maintain computer systems taking the security of these systems into consideration.

Among the topics included in this unit are: CPUs, memory, input & output devices, ALU operations, program execution, operating systems (including kernel, file systems, API and system calls), hardware management, installation, firmware, device drivers, networking (including OSI and TCP/IP models), error and information gathering, fault diagnostics, security and problem resolution.

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to explain the purpose and role of operating systems, the relationship between the subsystems embedded within a central processing unit, the core hardware and software components associated with computer operations and be able to configure the hardware and systems needed to establish a computer network together with practical diagnostic and troubleshooting techniques. As a result they will develop skills such as communication literacy, critical thinking, analysis, reasoning and interpretation which are crucial for gaining employment and developing academic competence.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit students will be able to:

LO1 Explain the relationships between hardware components and the subsystems used in a computer system.

LO2 Categorise the key features and services provided by different computer operating systems and hardware.

LO3 Use network communication technology and the associated services to connect computer systems.

LO4 Demonstrate diagnostic and troubleshooting skills to solve hardware, software and networking related issues.



Programming

Programming

Programming involves describing processes and procedures which are derived from algorithms. The ability to program is what sets apart a developer and an end user.

Typically the role of the developer is to instruct a device (such as a computer) to carry out instructions; the instructions are known as source code and is written in a language that is converted into something the device can understand. The device executes the instructions it is given.

Algorithms help to describe the solution to a problem or task; by identifying the data and the process needed to represent the problem or task and the set of steps needed to produce the desired result.

Programming languages typically provide the representation of both the data and the process; they provide control constructs and data types (which can be numbers, words, and objects, and be constant or variable).

The control constructs are used to represent the steps of an algorithm in a convenient yet unambiguous fashion. Algorithms require constructs that can perform sequential processing, selection for decision-making, and iteration for repetitive control. Any programming language that provides these basic features can be used for algorithm representation.

This unit introduces students to the core concepts of programming with an introduction to algorithms and the characteristics of programming paradigms. Among the topics included in this unit are: introduction to algorithms, procedural, object-orientated & event-driven programming, security considerations, the integrated development environment and the debugging process.


World Degree Corporate Training

World Degree Corporate Training

The World Degree University was founded to bring a common world degree culture, loyalty and belonging to the company. Our goal is to make the most of our investment in education. It is important to organize our corporate training to remain competitive in today's economy so that we can retain employees and start and support changes in our organization.       


Passionate life coaching

Passionate life coaching

This course helps people make progress in their lives for a greater sense of accomplishment. Our passionate coaches help you improve your relationships, entrepreneurship, career and daily life.

We can help you define goals, identify the obstacles that stand in your way, and then develop strategies to overcome each obstacle. In developing this strategy, you will be committed to developing your own unique skills and rewards. By helping you maximize your strengths, you'll get the support you need to make long-term changes.

Many people are looking for guidance for major life changes, such as pursuing new careers. However, in many cases, people turn to us for help to build happier, more meaningful lives.

There are many indications that working with our coaches can help you. 

These signs include:

  • Frequent irritability
  • High levels of stress and/or anxiety
  • You can't get rid of bad habits
  • There is a lack of satisfaction in social life
  • Constant dissatisfaction at work
  • Creativity is hindered

In recent years, we have gained considerable influence in the mainstream. In fact, more and more creatives, executives, and entrepreneurs are now working closely with us to succeed in their professional and personal lives.


Global Global DevOps

Global Global DevOps

Global Global DevOps

DevOps is a set of practices that combines software development (Dev) and business operations (Ops). It aims to shorten the Business System development life cycle and provide continuous delivery with high software quality. DevOps is complementary to Agile project management, and business software development; several DevOps aspects came from the Agile methodology.

Global Sales, Marketing and Products Development

Global Sales, Marketing and Products Development

Consistency between marketing and sales remains important, and marketing leaders continue to look for ways to strengthen partnerships and improve performance. Here, we focus on sales and marketing meetings, which can be a great opportunity to ensure harmony and incremental improvement for our products.

Global Sales, Marketing, and Product meeting is a regular weekly meeting between the sales, marketing, and product development team designed to ensure initial and ongoing consistency between the group. The goal is to reach consensus and agreement on goals, tactics, expectations, strategies, and performance.

Refreshion Metaverse Entrepreneurship Level 1 Passion (Cantonese)

Refreshion Metaverse Entrepreneurship Level 1 Passion (Cantonese)

本單元使學生瞭解創業的定義和範圍,瞭解創業的驅動因素和障礙。   學生將瞭解民族文化和經濟對創業的影響,並將探索企業家的個人特徵以及個人情境因素的影響,包括教育和背景。

學生還將瞭解小企業對經濟的作用和重要性,以及社會企業和社會經濟。學生還將被期望了解開始新業務的風險和回報的平衡,他們將調查和反思他們的創業和進取特徵。將討論企業家和創業組織的例子,並期望學生利用當地,個人和一般知識以及他們的學習,以便能夠識別初創企業的特徵。

學習成果

在本模組結束時,學生將能夠:

探索並說明一系列可能被視為企業家精神的風險投資類型。

評估小企業對經濟的影響。

識別和評估創業思維的關鍵方面。

研究促進或阻礙創業的不同環境


Refreshion Metaverse Entrepreneurship Level 1 Passion (English)

Refreshion Metaverse Entrepreneurship Level 1 Passion (English)

This unit provides students with an understanding of the definition and scope of Entrepreneurship and an understanding of the enablers and barriers to business start-up.      Students will learn about the influence of national culture and economy on entrepreneurship and will explore the personal characteristics of entrepreneurs and the impact of personal situational factors, including education and background.

Students will also learn about the role and importance of small firms to the economy, and about social enterprise and the social economy. Students will also be expected to understand the balance of risk and reward in starting a new venture and they will investigate and reflect on their own entrepreneurial and enterprising characteristics. Examples of entrepreneurs and start-up organisations will be discussed and students will be expected to draw on local, personal and general knowledge together with their learning to be able to identify the characteristics of entrepreneurial ventures.

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this unit a student will be able to:

Explore and illustrate the range of venture types that might be considered entrepreneurial.

Assess the impact of small businesses on the economy.

Determine and assess the key aspects of an entrepreneurial mindset.

Examine the different environments that foster or hinder entrepreneurship